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Thread: The Irish Glass Bottle Company, Ringsend

  1. #1

    The Irish Glass Bottle Company, Ringsend


  2. #2

    The glass bottle choir about 1950


  3. #3
    feisty
    Guest
    hi overtime, intersting bit of history there..a few yrs ago i was working on the construction of apartments in ballybough (behind meaghers pub) and during the excavation for foundations we turned up a lot of old glass, some of it was broken and there were diffent colors, blues greens etc..at 1st i thought it was from the pub.but then i was told that there was at one time a glass manufacturers in the area..wonder does anyone else know anything about this.
    i took home some old bottles..old green gin bottle, vinegar, medicine bottles etc..if i can find them i will post phots.

  4. #4
    Great to see the photos......
    There I am sure had to be more than one glass bottle factory, would be great if you got the name of the factory your bottles came from.

    Even the dáil has a debate on the colour of them

    http://historical-debates.oireachtas...505070023.html
    Last edited by overtime; 13-04-2012 at 17:23.

  5. #5
    feisty
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by overtime View Post
    Great to see the photos......
    There I am sure had to be more than one glass bottle factory, would be great if you got the name of the factory your bottles came from.

    Even the dáil has a debate on the colour of them

    http://historical-debates.oireachtas...505070023.html
    lol very good.

  6. #6
    feisty
    Guest
    i've read that there was a man called broughall who made a fortune in the early 1800s from manufacturing plate glass in the north strand area.the glass was exported to cadiz and also used to make coaches.he might be worth looking up.

  7. #7
    Wots the story jamjar's Avatar
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    A Bit Of History

    Ringesend's history of glass and bottle making goes back a long, long time. At one time alone in the 1930's, there were eight factories within a five minute walk. The English put it on a truly commercial base in 1787, when it made it's first factory here. The first ever was said to be one in the St. Michan's area of Dublin,at St.Mary's lane. Ireland did a brisk trade, and their glass was said to be as good as anywhere else in the world. Many families came over from England looking for work, and settled.

    Ringsend was not only to be invaded by the fishermen, but also the bottle blowers. It took five men in the early part of the century to make a bottle. One was the bottle maker himself, who was boss, the gatherer who took the glass from the tank, a servitor, who blew the actual bottle, and a wetter off, who took each bottle out of it's mould and the boy to stack them. It was hard dangerous work. The men had no protection from what they were inhaling. To make glass, each 'Batch' was twenty barrow's of sand, three bags of salt keg, manganese, arsenic and seven bags of broken glass (Cullet). This was all piled into a tank and melted. When it was beginning to melt, seven barrows of broken red bricks were added for extra strength.

    In 1917, an Enniscorthy man living in America invented the bottle making machine, which could make ten bottles simultaneously. Mr. King, one of the brothers who owned the I.G.B. on Charlotte Quay brought the machine the following year over to his plant. The bottle makers were a tight knit clan, and it was a hard job to get into if not connected. Apprenticeships started at the age of thirteen. They also kept to themselves in the many pubs, they were easily recognised because of their sallow skins. They worked twelve hour shifts and a man used to go around with a big stick and tap on the windows to wake up the men. If he hit the wrong window, say of a docker, a row usually ensued. Martin Crean owned a factory on Fitzwilliam Quay, and Street, Donovan's also on Richard Street, Elija Pring owned the 'Ringsend Bottle Company, The Hibernian Glass Company, the Bottleworks and the 'Crib' which specialised in pharmaceutical bottles. Those who worked in the Crib were not recognised by the other bottle makers.

    They also had their own hall built at the turn of the century at 1A Ringsend Road. This hall was not open to all, only on special occasions were the other workers from the area let in, maybe for a game of ' Housey Housey' (Bingo) which was played on leather squares which you marked off with chalk, then later took home to resole your shoes. There was up to six full size snooker tables, all this was watched by the late Giggin's' O' Reilly . When he died, the hall seemed doomed. The hall closed its doors for good in the sixties, when it was sold off to a Mr. Ekker, and then on to 'Contractors ' Plant and Hire' next door to it. It has been idle since.

    Ringesend's history of glass and bottle making goes back a long, long time. At one time alone in the 1930's, there were eight factories within a five minute walk. The English put it on a truly commercial base in 1787, when it made it's first factory here. The first ever was said to be one in the St. Michan's area of Dublin,at St.Mary's lane. Ireland did a brisk trade, and their glass was said to be as good as anywhere else in the world. Many families came over from England looking for work, and settled there.

    In 1917, an Enniscorthy man living in America invented the bottle making machine, which could make ten bottles simultaneously. Mr. King, one of the brothers who owned the I.G.B. on Charlotte Quay brought the machine the following year over to his plant. The bottle makers were a tight knit clan, and it was a hard job to get into if not connected. Apprenticeships started at the age of thirteen. They also kept to themselves in the many pubs, they were easily recognised because of their sallow skins. They worked twelve hour shifts and a man used to go around with a big stick and tap on the windows to wake up the men. If he hit the wrong window, say of a docker, a row usually ensued. Martin Crean owned a factory on Fitzwilliam Quay, and Street, Donovan's also on Richard Street, Elija Pring owned the 'Ringsend Bottle Company, The Hibernian Glass Company, the Bottleworks and the 'Crib' which specialised in pharmaceutical bottles. Those who worked in the Crib were not recognised by the other bottle makers.

    They also had their own hall built at the turn of the century at 1A Ringsend Road. This hall was not open to all, only on special occasions were the other workers from the area let in, maybe for a game of ' Housey Housey' (Bingo) which was played on leather squares which you marked off with chalk, then later took home to resole your shoes. There was up to six full size snooker tables, all this was watched by the late Giggin's' O' Reilly . When he died, the hall seemed doomed. The hall closed its doors for good in the sixties, when it was sold off to a Mr. Ekker, and then on to 'Contractors ' Plant and Hire' next door to it. It has been idle since.


    Source http://www.news4.ie/christmas1997/frame3/frontpage.htm



















































































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    Last edited by jamjar; 13-04-2012 at 21:24.
    When theres 'nere a rasher to grease your pan, an aul jam sandwich is yer only man .

  8. #8
    Senior Member mickelene's Avatar
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    Jamjar They also had their own hall built at the turn of the century at 1A Ringsend Road. This hall was not open to all, only on special occasions were the other workers from the area let in, maybe for a game of ' Housey Housey' (Bingo) which was played on leather squares which you marked off with chalk, then later took home to resole your shoes. There was up to six full size snooker tables, all this was watched by the late Giggin's' O' Reilly . When he died, the hall seemed doomed. The hall closed its doors for good in the sixties, when it was sold off to a Mr. Ekker, and then on to 'Contractors ' Plant and Hire' next door to it. It has been idle since.
    .................................................. ...........

    The IGB also had a social club on the Goatstown Road, dont know if its still there or not
    http://thedublinforums.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=120&dateline=13278399  83

  9. #9
    Senior Member. ph.'s Avatar
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    Mick the club in Goatstown is long gone its all blocked up,was there a row of houses going up to the flats in Beechill on the right owned by IGB workers ?

  10. #10
    chief bottle washer BREENER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ph. View Post
    Mick the club in Goatstown is long gone its all blocked up,was there a row of houses going up to the flats in Beechill on the right owned by IGB workers ?
    yeah ph. theyre still there and mostly still have families of i g b men living in them.


    "There was up to six full size snooker tables, all this was watched by the late Giggin's' O' Reilly . When he died, the hall seemed doomed. The hall closed its doors for good in the sixties, when it was sold off to a Mr. Ekker, and then on to 'Contractors ' Plant and Hire' next door to it. It has been idle since."

    my granda in the bottler club mid 50s
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